Sunday, 16 February 2020

ANNOUNCING GENEALOGY RESEARCH TOURS FOR 2021

I can now confirm tours for 2021. Although I had stated that there would be no Edinburgh tour in 2021, I have changed that up. The reason being that I have moved the timing of the tour to April so that the group can also attend the annual conference for the SAFHS which is being held in Dundee on April 24th. I know a couple of you were eager to get to Dundee and this may well be your golden opportunity. 
TWO TOURS: 
EDINBURGH - APRIL 18-23 2021
GLASGOW - APRIL 25 - MAY 1 2021
The Edinburgh tour will begin April 18th which, as always, is the day of arrival. Research will take place at the ScotlandsPeople Centre/NRS for three full days. There will be a chance to research at both the Scottish Genealogy Society and the NLS but the timing will depend on group size. You may have to choose just one of these places.

If you wish to attend the SAFHS conference, you can either:
 
  1. Leave Edinburgh Friday evening and take a train to Dundee (train fees are not included) which will get you into Dundee ahead of the conference. We have rooms reserved at the Best Western in Dundee.  You can stay Friday and/or Saturday.
  2. Remain in Edinburgh Friday night and take the train up to Dundee Saturday morning. The conference usually begins about 10 am. You can stay at the hotel in Dundee on the Saturday evening. 
  3. Remain in Edinburgh throughout and take the train up Saturday, returning to Edinburgh following the close of the conference without staying in Dundee at all and without needing to move your luggage. 
For those staying in Dundee, you may wish to stay in Dundee for a few extra days and do some research locally. If that is the case, let me know and I will see if the hotel has availability.

If you have ancestors from the Aberdeen area, you may wish to attend the conference so that you can speak to the Aberdeen and North East Scotland FHS.  You may then wish to travel to Aberdeen from Dundee to spend a couple of days locally. The train ride is about an hour or the bus is about 90 minutes. Any travel to Aberdeen will be at your own planning and expense.

There will be a Glasgow tour following the SAFHS conference, beginning April 25th, as the day of arrival. If you wish to attend the SAFHS conference ahead of Glasgow research, you can arrive in Dundee on Friday the 23rd and stay in Dundee at the Best Western. You can then head to Glasgow on the Sunday. Train travel from Dundee to Glasgow is not included in the fees.

The Glasgow tour will run from April 25th until May 1st. Research will take place at the Mitchell Library and at both the Lanarkshire FHS and the Glasgow and West of Scotland FHS.

The registration for the 2021 tours is slightly different given that there are options not normally included, namely the opportunity to attend the SAFHS conference. You will notice that rather than just paying your deposit, you will need to fill out a form. This will help ME in keeping track of who is going where. When you click on the registration button, you will be taken to the Scottish ViC site to fill out the registration form and pay the deposit.

For more information and to register:
https://www.genealogytoursofscotland.ca/home.html

 
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Friday, 14 February 2020

North Lanarkshire Poor Law Records Added to Ancestry


In August 2019 many - but by no means all - of North Lanarkshire’s Poor Law records were made available in digitised form on Ancestry.com. This article provides an overview of which records you will be able to find and how you can use them for your family history research.  You can read an extended version of this article on: https://blogs.ancestry.co.uk/ancestry/2019/08/16/making-discoveries-in-the-north-lanarkshire-poor-law-records/

What are Poor Law records?
Poor Law records are records which were created under the Poor Law (Scotland) Act 1845 which established a secular system of distributing poor relief.  The main records of interest to family history researchers are those kept by the official appointed in each parish to investigate cases of poverty and to pay out relief, the Inspector of Poor.  These are the Registers of Poor and the Record of Applications for Relief.
North Lanarkshire Archives’ Poor Law records originate from civil parishes which existed within the former County of Lanark between 1845 and 1930.  On Ancestry you will find the digitised registers of the following parishes: Bothwell, Cambusnethan (Wishaw area), Dalziel (Motherwell area) and Shotts.

Why are these records of interest to family history researchers?
As the application and registration system involved a type of means testing which required detailed information about the person applying for relief and about their family, the resulting records can contain details of your ancestor you would not find together on one page anywhere else.  Poor Law records therefore can help take your research further at any stage of your family history journey.

 

Registers of Poor / later General Registers of Poor
Initially, each parish maintained a Register of Poor (General Register of Poor from 1865).  In this example from a General Register of Poor from Dalziel Parish (below) you can see why these are such a fascinating resource.  The example regards Mary Doyle or Slamin who first applied for poor relief when her husband was ill and then stayed in the system for several years after he passed away.  The document shows at the top her circumstances at the time of her acceptance into the system and in the bottom part what happened to her and her children while she received money from the parish.


Registers of Poor/General Registers of Poor digitised:
CO1/23 Bothwell Parish
Bothwell Parish Council. Register of poorhouse inmates. 1905 – 1909
Bothwell Parish Council. Children's separate register. 1909-1915
Bothwell Parish Council. Register of guardians. 1909-1915
Bothwell Parish Council. Register of other parish poor. 1912-1914
Bothwell Parish Council. General Register of Poor. 1894-1915
Bothwell Parochial Board. General Register of Poor. 1862-1888
Bothwell Parochial Board. Account, charge and discharge, and list of registered poor. 1892-1896
CO1/26 Cambusnethan Parish
Cambusnethan Parochial Board. Register of Poor. 1863 - 1864
Cambusnethan Parish Council. Register of other parish poor. 1885 - 1915
CO1/37 Dalziel Parish
Dalziel Parish Council. Registered poor pay roll. 1893-1912
Dalziel Parish Council. General Register of Poor. 1883-1892 and 1900-1916
CO1/54 Shotts Parish
Shotts Parochial Board. Register of Poor. 1846-1865 and 1871-1879
Shotts Parish Council. General Registers of Poor. 1870-1911

Applications for Relief
Application Registers contain more entries per year than the Registers of Poor as multiple applications from individual paupers are recorded as well as details of the so called 'casual poor', i.e. persons who received a one-off payment from the inspector without a decision by the board and therefore were not recorded on the poor roll.
The applications for poor relief recorded the main information the Inspector of Poor required to make a decision on the applicant.  These included:
·       Age
·       Religion (Prot. – R.C.)
·       Occupation
·       Average Value of Earnings per week
·       Names of Dependants and Children living with Applicant, and Ages and Earnings
·       Names of Children not living with Applicant (Ages – Residences – and Earnings)
·       Country of Birth (English, Irish, Foreign – or Parish if Scotland)
·       Condition (Married – Single – Widow – Widower – Orphan – Deserted – Separated)
·       Cause of Disablement, whether Wholly or Partially
·       Wholly or Partially Destitute
·       Name of Parents and circumstances if alive
·       Length of Residence in present House and of previous Residences (Settlement – Parishes claimed against &c.)

Application registers digitised:
CO1/23 Bothwell Parish
Bothwell index to registers of applications. 1900-1914
CO1/26 Cambusnethan Parish
Cambusnethan applications for relief. 1855-1916
CO1/37 Dalziel Parish
Dalziel application registers. 1865-1875 and 1877-1917

Poorhouse records
Only one item specifically dealing with poorhouse residents has been digitised which is the New Monkland Parish Poorhouse register of inmates, 1849 – 1862 (CO1/50/24).
There were several other poorhouses in North Lanarkshire whose specific registers have not survived.  However, you may find that your ancestor was sent to the poorhouse (indoor relief), rather than receiving outdoor relief, from their entries in the Application Registers and General Registers of Poor.

(with thanks to NL Archivist Wiebke McGhee)

Please contact HeritageCentre@culturenl.co.uk if you have any questions about the above and if you are interested in records which have not been digitised.




Wednesday, 12 February 2020

MyHeritage Colourization Tool - GAME CHANGER

In what is probably the biggest genealogical breakthrough since DNA, MyHeritage announced yesterday, their new Colorization Tool, MyHeritage in Color

As the keeper of the family memories, I have hundreds of photos. The tool is quick and easy to use and I must say the transformation from black and white to "living colour" is impactful. It hits you right in the feels. 

MyHeritage allows you to play with the program for free. On about 10-12 photos. Then you are taken to a payment page to subscribe. The subscription that allows unlimited colorization is the Premium Plus Complete Plan which was $269 cad. 

You can upload photos one at a time while in the MyHeritage in Color tool or you can upload several at a time to your photo album and then colourize them from there. The original B&W is retained. You can share your "new" photos on social media, copy a link to email the album or download individually to your computer. I found that on the first night, I was also limited in the number I could download and that was quite frustrating. The only way I could get them to my computer was to view the full image and "save as". The problem with that was they were all in JFIF format. None were shareable. I had to then download an extension to Chrome, email them to myself and then they were all automatically converted to JPEG upon download. Very cumbersome. However, that may have been a result of overuse of the site because today, there was no problem saving the photos directly from the colourization tool. And all in JPEG. 



The tool still needs some tweaking. It doesn't work well with blue and red, often giving a grey or mottled colour pattern, as seen on my dad's shirt. I can guarantee my dad never owned a camouflage shirt! 



Similarly, it appears colour blind between green and red, in one case turning a green and white striped shirt to red and white. And it doesn't recognize environmental factors such as shade/shadowing, as is seen here in my grandpa's seemingly diseased arm which is in fact in the shade. 



That said, these glitches are not enough for me not to recommend the tool. It is fun, addictive and very much a game changer when it comes to preserving family memories. As my cousin said, "it makes the photos look like they were just taken yesterday" and in so many ways brings the people and the places in the photos back to living memory. 








Photos evoke memories long suppressed. Seeing the black and white photos come to life with the colourization tool deepens and strengthens those memories and all of the warm feelings of love, belonging and connection that the memories hold. Without a doubt, the MyHeritage in Color tool is the new big thing in genealogy and family history. Well done to the MyHeritage team. 

Thursday, 30 January 2020

FREE FEBRUARY WEBINARS

I have scheduled 8 webinars for February. Four on Preserving Memories and 4 on Scottish research. Preserving Memories are on Wednesdays and Scottish are on Thursdays.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 5th, 8:00 pm eastern
Introduction to FOREVER permanent cloud storage

Learn how to use permanent online storage to organize your genealogy research. Learn about nesting albums to store your documents and photos according to family. The Forever guarantee is to store and preserve your precious photos, documents and videos for your life time plus 100 years. Guaranteed. Assign an account manager. Decide what happens to your photos and videos after you are no longer here. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/688316673737616141

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12th, 8:00 pm eastern
Introduction to Artisan Scrapbooking Software

Learn the features of this robust digital scrapbooking software. Artisan is 100% editable allowing you to make each page or project uniquely your own.
NOTE: Artisan is not compatible with MAC computers. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6292426285442347277

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 19th, 8:00 pm eastern
Create a Family Memory Book Tonight

Using Forever's Design and Print, you can quickly and easily create a quality memory book to share with family and friends. Take those holiday, vacation, reunion, sports championship photos and drop them into a book so that they can be shared with others instead of being stored on your phone or camera card. Design and Print works on MAC and PCs. You can even create a book from your phone, iPad or tablet while waiting in the doctor or dentist office, waiting for kids or partners to be finished in the change room or waiting for kids to exit the school. Let me show you how. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/233383842140876557

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26th, 8:00 pm eastern
LET'S GET THOSE MEMORIES CONVERTED!

Do you have a drawer, shoebox, tote or closet full of photos, slides, negatives, videos, disks or 8mm films? Join me online while I walk you through a conversion order. In less than an hour you will be ready to send those memories in to have them converted to be reclaimed, shared and enjoyed. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/629452119771791115

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6th, 8:00 pm eastern
GETTING STARTED WITH SCOTTISH RESEARCH

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1013877668675306509

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 13th, 8:00 pm eastern
BRICKWALL BUSTERS FOR SCOTTISH RESEARCH

 https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9006156222723426829

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 20th, 8:00 pm eastern
ONLINE SOURCES FOR SCOTTISH RESEARCH

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4519500069588171277

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 27th, 8:00 pm eastern
RESEARCHING HBC AND METIS ANCESTORS

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/352714938614765837

Wednesday, 29 January 2020

A Day Lost and a Lifetime Gained

Back in December, I sent in a box full of old 8mm films from 50+ years ago to Forever. One I was particularly interested in was me in Scotland as a child.


 I have the patience of a gnat. However, Forever sent an email to let me know that my conversion box had safely arrived. Then they sent me an email letting me know how much I owed for their services. Then they sent me an email letting me know when my order was lined up for production with an estimated date of when I could expect the conversion to be complete. That date was next week.

Yesterday morning, I received an email saying the work was complete. And that led me into a fantastic walk down memory lane. In real life. I could see my grandparents walking and interacting. I could see my mum, dad, aunts, uncles, cousins and family friends as real as if they were all still with us. I was so excited that I shared a few of the movies on Facebook with cousins. 


One in particular - the one I was anxious to see, has been shared and shared and shared since my grandfather had taken us to visit his brother's family, and two of my aunts. And because I have the premium video plan, everyone was able to watch the movies without having to download them first. 


The email from Forever came in about 10 am. I surfaced briefly at 6:30 pm to have a bite to eat and then was completely immersed in shared memories once again. Some might think I had lost a full day yesterday. But in reality, I gained an entire lifetime of memories. Memories really are priceless and precious. 

Not only did I gain back memories, but so did my cousins, aunts and uncles. Across two countries. We "gathered" on Facebook to share the stories, the memories and the laughs. We "gathered" via texts, messenger and on the phone to share as well. A day immersed in family. A lifetime of love and belonging deepened and strengthened. 

Isn't Forever expensive? Honestly? No. All of those reclaimed memories cost me less than others paid for a single film. And the platform allows me to share directly from my storage account. My family's memories are safe and secure and will outlast us by several generations. Immeasurable. 

Monday, 27 January 2020

ViC 2020 is in the Books!



This year's ViC was incredibly successful. And for that I have to thank each and every one of the attendees for trusting that the program was going to be worth the money and time that you invested.

I owe a great deal of thanks to this year’s presenters as well:

Stephen Mullen
Irene O’Brien
Margaret Fox
Emma Maxwell
Aoife O’Brien

Thanks to each of you for being so willing to share your knowledge with us and for making the day such a success. The feedback has been terrific and each one of you received accolades on your presentations. New information that we didn’t know before the day started and a renewed interest in the lives of our Scottish ancestors.

Ideas are already coming in for next year, from both attendees and speakers. And that tells me how engaged people are in this learning platform. Save the date! ViC 2021 will be Saturday, February 23.

Friday, 24 January 2020

Time is Running Out!


Registration for this year's Scottish ViC ends at midnight tonight. NO late registrations will be entertained. Once the registration link closes, that will end the opportunity to learn from this year's presenters on this year's topics.

Registration allows access to the recordings of the presentations for 30 days following the ViC so there is lots of time to go back and review or watch during waking hours.

7 Presentations:

Glasgow and the Caribbean Slave Trade by Dr Stephen Mullen
Researching Scottish Deaths by Dr Irene O'Brien
Using Newspapers for Scottish Research by Aoife O'Connor
Scottish Asylum Records by Emma Maxwell
Scottish Wills and Testaments by Margaret Fox
Scottish Prison Records by Emma Maxwell
Scottish Emigration to Canada by Christine Woodcock

Lots of chances to win free prizes

26 credits to add to your ScotlandsPeople account for everyone who is registered.

Don't miss out. Register HERE

*please note that your registration is NOT complete until you have paid the fees*


Wednesday, 22 January 2020

LAST CHANCE FOR THE SCOTTISH ViC


We are less than 72 hours away from this year's virtual conference for Scottish genealogy. Registration closes at midnight Friday. This ensures everyone gets the chance to be ready for Saturday.

We have 7 fantastic presentations on tap for the day.

Glasgow and the Caribbean Slave Trade
Researching Scottish Death
Using Newspapers for Scottish Research
Scottish Asylum Records
Scottish Wills and Testaments
Scottish Prison Records
Scots Emigration to Canada

ALL presentations are recorded allowing you to join us at the time of day that works for your schedule. You do not need to get up before dawn, or pull an all nighter to take part in the ViC. Simply jump in when you are ready and go back to view the presentations you missed when time allows. It's like shotgun golf. Start on presentation 3 perhaps and end on 2. Or start at 5 and end on 4. You won't miss any flow if you don't watch the presentations in order.

If you live in Aus or NZ, perhaps you can watch presentation one, head to bed, get up and catch presentation 7. Then go back at your leisure and watch the other presentations. If you are on the west coast, start with presentation 3 and after the day is over, go back and watch the first two. If you have plans for Burn's Night, watch until it is time to go get ready, go and enjoy the haggis and whisky then watch the remaining presentations on Sunday.

Prizes will be drawn throughout the day. You do NOT need to be online at the time of the drawing. If you are a winner and not able to join at that time, your prize will still be sent to you. If you are registered, you are eligible to win. 

Saturday, 18 January 2020

Just a Week to Go!



The Scottish ViC is just one week away! A full day of presentations for people researching their own Scottish ancestry or who are conducting research for clients with Scottish ancestry. 

The day starts at 8:30 with a presentation on Scotland, and in particular, Glasgow's involvement in the Caribbean Slave Trade. This presentation is given by Dr Stephen Mullen of the University of Glasgow who has conducted research in this area. 

Next up is Dr Irene O'Brien, Sr archivist at Glasgow City Archives who will show us the various records available for researching your ancestor's death. Dr O'Brien's presentations are always chock full of detailed information to show you just how much information you can glean from the records available in local archives. 

Irene is followed by Aoife O'Connor. Aoife works with Findmypast and is their expert on the British Newspaper Archives. Aoife will show us how to get the most out of Scottish newspapers for learning more about the rich details of our ancestor's lives. 

The morning closes off with genealogist Emma Maxwell. Emma and her husband run Scottishindexes. Emma will walk us through using Asylum records to learn about some of the sadder stories of our ancestor's lives. 

We then take a break to have lunch, do some research and recharge before starting the afternoon off with archivist Margaret Fox. Margaret is retired but formerly worked at the National Records of Scotland. Margaret will be giving an in-depth presentation on using Scottish Wills and Testaments and how you can get rich details on your ancestor's life by using these documents. 

ScotlandsPeople have generously provided 26 free credits to all registrants. This will allow registrants to download 2 wills and one other record. 

Following Margaret is a return by genealogist Emma Maxwell who, in this presentation, will show us the deep detailed information that can be gleaned from Prison records. 

Wrapping up the day is genealogy educator Christine Woodcock who will look at the reasons that led to Scots leaving Scotland and settling in Canada and the records that they generated as a result of their emigration. 

The recordings of all presentations are available until February 25th, 2020. 

"Door" prizes: 

1 year subscription to MyHeritage
1 year subscription to Findmypast
1 month subscription to Findmypast 
1 year subscription to Legacy Family Tree Webinars
1 Legacy Family Tree Software

All for just $99cad (~75usd)

To register: https://www.genealogyvic.com/

Tuesday, 14 January 2020

10 DAYS UNTIL THE SCOTTISH ViC

SAVE THE DATE - JANUARY 25th 2020


The Scottish ViC is just 10 days away! This is the ONLY virtual event solely dedicated to Scottish genealogy research. 

For this year's ViC, instead of having a marketplace, I have secured some fun things to be given as prizes during the day of the ViC. 

ScotlandsPeople is providing 26 credits for everyone who is registered for the ViC. This will allow you to retrieve 2 wills and one other document. 

MyHeritage has donated a subscription to be given as a prize

Findmypast has donated TWO subscriptions to be given as prizes. One is for a 12 month subscription and the other is for a 1 month subscription

Legacy Family Tree has also donated TWO prizes. One is for FREE Legacy Family Tree software and the other is for a subscription to Legacy's webinar library. 

ScottishIndexes is offering a discounted rate for their document retrieval services to all registrants of the virtual conference. 

To register: https://www.genealogyvic.com/

Wednesday, 8 January 2020

FREE SCOTLANDSPEOPLE CREDITS FOR ViC REGISTRANTS


ScotlandsPeople is graciously providing 26 FREE credits for everyone who registers for the Scottish ViC. These can be added to your account and used, if you wish, to retrieve a couple of wills (10 credits each) after you learn from Margaret Fox about the rich details that are contained within these important documents.

To register: 
https://www.genealogyvic.com/

Thursday, 2 January 2020

No Resolutions, Just a List



I don't DO resolutions. I have never done well with goal setting. Goals seem so clinical to me. Maybe because they were such an integral part of my work over 35+ years.

But I do like lists. When I was working I would make a list of things to get done today, this week and this month. And I would work my way through them. In a world of social services where so much of our impact is unseen, these lists were like widgets and I could actually see I was making progress.

My list for 2020 is fairly simple:

Organize my photos. As most of you will know I use Forever storage for my photos, documents and videos. It is a good fit for me as a genealogist. I can organize everything into albums, keep them safe and secure (and not deteriorating) for future generations and share as I choose. I set the privacy and I maintain copyright. That said, I need to work my way through adding descriptors to my photos so that future generations will understand why I saved the photos and why they are important.


I plan to make more photo books. These are a great way to share with others. They evoke memories, which in turn results in stories being shared. They also evoke emotion because of the feelings associated with the photos.
Photo books can also be a way of sharing why we have held onto artifacts. My mother saved nothing. I was over the top when it came to saving things for my kids. My daughter recently purchased a house and so is about to inherit her "treasure box" I have created a photo book to explain some of the things in her treasure box and why they are important enough to have been saved. I have given her permission to rid herself of anything she doesn't want to keep but she will still have a record of those treasures in the photo book.


In 2020 I plan to create books for the things I have in my china cabinets that have been saved for a generation or two.

Also on my list is working to add more information to the "notes" section of my family tree software. I have the notes in hard copy but I want to add that into my tree so that the stories will be carried forward.

What about YOU? What things are on your To-Do list for 2020?